A CALL TO ACTION – 12 YEARS NORTHERN TERRITORY INTERVENTION
The situation in the NT under the Intervention/ Stronger Futures legislation is untenable as articulated in this recent open letter from the Intervention Rollback Action Group (IRAG) in Alice Springs to the Minister for Indigenous Australians, The Hon. Ken Wyatt AM MP. On 26th June IRAG also released a damning 12 Year NT Intervention report card. In the letter the group outline changes that are required; from a return to locally led and run solutions, repealing the legislation, transitioning to voluntary income management, a veto on child removal, and enabling [Federal] Treaty processes to be set up and run by First Nations people and more. ‘Concerned Australians’ are encouraging you to read their open letter and write to relevant Ministers to express your concern and for them to heed the call of the people. Find out more here.

OPEN LETTER FROM THE JUSTICE AND PEACE COMMISSION OF HONG KONG
Following the controversial Extradition Bill of the Hong Kong government and the massive public protests of the past month, the Justice and Peace Commission of the Diocese of Hong Kong is calling for the Extradition Bill to be a focus of protest and consultation at the G20 Summit. The letter states that, ‘Despite the general dissent, the Police had responded by cracking down on unarmed peaceful protesters with an iron fist on 12 June 2019, causing 
disproportional casualties and furious public outcry. We urge the Hong Kong Government to: 1) establish a completely impartial and independent Commission of Inquiry into the circumstances of the incident on 12 June 2019 and the action of the Police force; 2) retract the official description of the protest on 12 June 2019 as “riot”; and 3) adhering to public demands by formally withdrawing the Extradition Bill from the Legislative Council immediately.’ Cardinal John Tong, Apostolic Administrator of the Catholic Diocese of Hong Kong and Rev. Eric So Shing-yit, Chairperson of the Hong Kong Christian Council had earlier called on Government to make an explicit, public statement that the Bill has been ‘withdrawn’, to meet the strong demand of the general public. You can read their statement here.

ACRATH FUNDRAISER.
This is a call to help combat modern day slavery. Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans has launched its national fund-raising appeal today in a bid to raise $400,000 to continue its work fighting human trafficking and modern slavery. ACRATH now relies entirely on donations after last year losing its $125,000 a year grant from the Federal Government. Executive Officer Christine Carolan said the community’s generosity in the past year had ensured ACRATH’s raft of programs to combat modern day slavery and forced marriage had continued. ‘With community donations we have been able to achieve a great deal. We have worked closely with the community and government, health, education and civic leaders to bring about systemic change and prevent human trafficking and slavery. To lend your support ACRATH’s vital work, visit here.

REPORT: CUTTING THE SAFETY NET: The Impact of Cuts to Status Resolution Support Services
The Asylum Seeker Resource Centre (ASRC) has released a report exposing a crisis of hunger, deteriorating health and homelessness as asylum seekers are cut off Status Resolution Support Services (SRSS). The Federal Government cut its budget for SRSS by 60% in two years, from $139.8 million to $56.2 million. More than 1200 men and women have been cut off torture and trauma services, subsidised medication, casework and income support of 89% of Newstart or approximately $250 per week to cover rent and food for single adults. Now families with children over six years old are being cut off, with 42% of recipients of SRSS under 25 years of age. The ASRC is calling on the government to stop cutting families off support immediately and to restore SRSS to all people seeking asylum within 100 days of the new government. To access the report, visit here.

REPORT: MEASURING PEACE IN A COMPLEX WORLD
The 13
th annual edition of the Global Peace Index, published by the Institute for Economics and Peace, shows the average level of global peacefulness improved for the first time in five years. However, the world remains considerably less peaceful now than a decade ago. Iceland remains the most peaceful country in the world and Afghanistan is now the least peaceful, replacing Syria. Bhutan recorded the largest improvement of any country in the top 20, rising 43 places on the index in the last 12 years. For the first time, the report analyses the security risks posed by climate change. More than 400 million people live in areas with low levels of peacefulness and high risk from climate change. To download the report, visit here.

REPORT: COMPOUND COSTS: HOW CLIMATE CHANGE IS DAMAGING AUSTRALIA’S ECONOMY
The Climate Council of Australia has released a new report highlighting the economic impact of climate change and the costs of not addressing the issues. Australia has always been a land of droughts and flooding rains. However, in the past, extreme weather events were cyclical around a stable average, allowing enough time for recovery between events. Now, climate change is driving a trend change, increasing both the frequency and severity of many extreme weather events. If climate change continues unabated, extreme weather and climate events will increasingly cause economic shocks that will cascade through the economy. To access the report, visit here.

REPORT: MAKING CITIES WORK FOR ALL
Cities are places where opportunities for prosperity coexist with stark inequalities between the richest and the poorest. They can also concentrate inequalities, when access to opportunities seems stalled for many low-income urban residents, who often live in distressed neighbourhoods.  This OECD report provides comparable data on economic growth, inequalities and well-being at the city level in OECD countries. It provides empirical evidence on how cities are diverging from, or converging with, other parts of the country, and of the extent of inequality within cities. It proposes a framework for action, to help national and local governments reorient policies towards more inclusive growth. The report can be accessed here.

REPORT: SKILLING THE AUSTRALIAN WORKFORCE FOR THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
Digital technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics and automation are transforming the world of work. The National Centre for Vocational Education Research has explored the current digital skills demand and supply situation in Australia’s workforce. The research investigated the skills impact of digitalisation on two industry sectors—transport and logistics, and public safety and correctional services—as well as the wider workforce. The report recommends a national workplace digital skills framework to help identify digital skills gaps among Australian industries and workforces to enable the development of appropriate training programs. To access the report, visit here

APP: RIGHTS APP PROVIDES EASY ACCESS TO INTERNATIONAL INSTRUMENTS
Rights App is a free quick reference guide to international human rights law. It contains the full text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, ten other major international human rights treaties and agreements, and the corresponding optional protocols. Developed by the Australian Human Rights Commission and LexisNexis®, RightsApp is the world’s first mobile application that allows users to quickly and easily search international human rights conventions and declarations by topic and right. In addition to containing the text of some of the world’s most important international human rights treaties and agreements, RightsApp also contains signatory information and relevant United Nations committees’ general comments. RightsApp can be downloaded for free from the Apple App Store and Google Play Store.

APP: ARC HELPS SURVIVORS TO TELL THEIR STORY
Women experiencing family violence have the opportunity to take control of their story with a free smartphone app called Arc that enables them to identify, document and record patterns of intimate partner behaviour that make them feel scared, unsafe, or intimidated. The app enables anyone experiencing family violence to track details of abusive behaviour by uploading photos, videos, audio and diary entries to create a record of what has happened, when it happened, and how it made them feel. Developed by Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria with funding from the Victorian Government’s Public Sector Innovation Fund and the Department of Social Services, Arc may be used to help victim survivors explain their story to a friend, family member or a support service, to provide key information to police, in court, or with legal or family violence practitioners. Find out more here and download the app from the App Store or Google Play Store.

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